Red Wings

Henrik Zetterberg takes aim at NHL officiating after loss to Florida

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Photo: Eliot J. Schechter / National Hockey League / Getty

Red Wings captain Henrik Zetterberg voiced his own frustration along with what’s assumed to be the rest of his team’s as well in the wake of Detroit‘s 3-2 loss to the Florida Panthers Saturday night.

The ire of the captain comes amid Florida’s Jonathan Huberdeau‘s late third period goal that gave the win to the Panthers on home ice.

But it wasn’t just the goal so much as it was Huberdeau appearing to interfere with Petr Mrazek during the course of the play. Obviously given the outcome the Huberdeau didn’t earn himself a goaltender interference call prompting Zeterberg to call out what he believes are inconsistencies within NHL officiating.

theScore:

“The inconsistency in this league right now, if it’s the refs or it’s the (review team) in Toronto or if it’s the suspensions or if it’s the fines, it’s hard for us as players to know what rules we are playing under,” Zetterberg said after the game, per Helene St. James of the Detroit Free Press.

“You see it over and over again,” Zetterberg continued. “Losing a game like this that is really important, the points are really important, on a call that yesterday could have been goalie interference and tonight it’s not. Probably tomorrow that will be goalie interference again. That’s what’s frustrating for us. They have to find a way to deal with this.”

But anyways you be the judge. Did Mrazek get interfered with during the play?

Zetterberg’s complaints shouldn’t be confused with flat out whining or bitching over a season that’s probably going to result in another missed postseason for Detroit. The issues regarding goaltender interference is something that’s very real for the NHL right now. Two days ago Anaheim’s Corey Perry also made mentioned that goaltender interference can ‘go anyway on any given night’ while Canadiens goaltender Carey Price said that “(he) couldn’t tell you what’s a penalty and what’s not. That’s something that I don’t understand.”

Here’s the NHL’s official rule on interference with a goaltender:

69.1 Interference on the Goalkeeper – This rule is based on the premise that an attacking player’s position, whether inside or outside the crease, should not, by itself, determine whether a goal should be allowed or disallowed. In other words, goals scored while attacking players are standing in the crease may, in appropriate circumstances be allowed. Goals should be disallowed only if: (1) an attacking player, either by his positioning or by contact, impairs the goalkeeper’s ability to move freely within his crease or defend his goal; or (2) an attacking player initiates intentional or deliberate contact with a goalkeeper, inside or outside of his goal crease. Incidental contact with a goalkeeper will be permitted, and resulting goals allowed, when such contact is initiated outside of the goal crease, provided the attacking player has made a reasonable effort to avoid such contact. The rule will be enforced exclusively in accordance with the on-ice judgement of the Referee(s), but may be subject to a Coach’s Challenge (see Rule 78.7). For purposes of this rule, “contact,” whether incidental or otherwise, shall mean any contact that is made between or among a goalkeeper and attacking player(s), whether by means of a stick or any part of the body. The overriding rationale of this rule is that a goalkeeper should have the ability to move freely within his goal crease without being hindered by the actions of an attacking player. If an attacking player enters the goal crease and, by his actions, impairs the goalkeeper’s ability to defend his goal, and a goal is scored, the goal will be disallowed. If an attacking player has been pushed, shoved, or fouled by a defending player so as to cause him to come into contact with the goalkeeper, such contact will not be deemed contact initiated by the attacking player for purposes of this rule, provided the attacking player has made a reasonable effort to avoid such contact. If a defending player has been pushed, shoved, or fouled by an attacking player so as to cause the defending player to come into contact with his own goalkeeper, such contact shall be deemed contact initiated by the attacking player for purposes of this rule, and if necessary a penalty assessed to the attacking player and if a goal is scored it would be disallowed.

69.2 Penalty – In all cases in which an attacking player initiates intentional or deliberate contact with a goalkeeper, whether or not the goalkeeper is inside or outside the goal crease, and whether or not a goal is scored, the attacking player will receive a penalty (minor or major, as the Referee deems appropriate). In all cases where the infraction being imposed is to the attacking player for hindering the goalkeeper’s ability to move freely in his goal crease, the penalty to be assessed is for goalkeeper interference. In exercising his judgment, the Referee should give more significant consideration to the degree and nature of the contact with the goalkeeper than to the exact location of the goalkeeper at the time of the contact.

69.3 Contact Inside the Goal Crease – If an attacking player initiates contact with a goalkeeper, incidental or otherwise, while the goalkeeper is in his goal crease, and a goal is scored, the goal will be disallowed. If a goalkeeper, in the act of establishing his position within his goal crease, initiates contact with an attacking player who is in the goal crease, and this results in an impairment of the goalkeeper’s ability to defend his goal, and a goal is scored, the goal will be disallowed. If, after any contact by a goalkeeper who is attempting to establish position in his goal crease, the attacking player does not immediately vacate his current position in the goal crease (i.e. give ground to the goalkeeper), and a goal is scored, the goal will be disallowed. In all such cases, whether or not a goal is scored, the attacking player will receive a minor penalty for goalkeeper interference. If an attacking player establishes a significant position within the goal crease, so as to obstruct the goalkeeper’s vision and impair his ability to defend his goal, and a goal is scored, the goal will be disallowed. For this purpose, a player “establishes a significant position within the crease” when, in the Referee’s judgment, his body, or a substantial portion thereof, is within the goal crease for more than an instantaneous period of time.

 

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